What’s on the Table at Your #ThanksgivingDinner?

#ThanksgivingDinner is a traditional meal with all kinds of various dishes Americans eat at the same time all over the country. Turkey or ham can be the main course, however, turkey is the overwhelming favorite. Those who eat ham usually don’t like turkey or want to try something new. Mashed potatoes, stuffing, and corn also abounds on Thanksgiving. You might find some candied yams and green bean casserole on the table, followed by some cranberry sauce and green and black olives. Perhaps crusty rolls, Brussels sprouts, or green salad make an appearance. For sure we can’t forget the gravy, and what about the apple cider? Do you drink wine or beer with dinner?

What about dessert? Tradition calls for pumpkin pie at the very least. You might find sweet potato pie on some tables. Pecan pie is another holiday favorite, and some people bake fresh apple pies as well.

But what are some dishes from around the country that you might not have heard of gracing a Thanksgiving Day spread? Let’s take a look at some of the stranger dishes that some families have made a tradition of for their #ThanksgivingDinner.

Macaroni and cheese is one such dish. While some people might scoff and think it’s everyone’s favorite, not every family in America includes Mac’n’cheese. Some folks prefer homemade cranberry sauce while others delight in canned jelly.

Ambrosia salad still graces the tables of some in the South, but many don’t even know what it is. It is a sweet dish, usually made with some kind of canned fruit and mini marshmallows mixed with Jell-O or Cool Whip.

Some folks throw out the green bean casserole in favor of collard greens. This is more popular in the South than it is anywhere else in the country. While most of us throw away the gizzards when preparing our bird, many folks save them, bread them, and fry them for serving.

Cornbread dressing is another favorite. Literally, it is cornbread dried out over a few days to make it crusty for stuffing. You can mix it with various ingredients and stuff your bird or cook it as a casserole.

For dessert, pumpkin cheesecake is an alternative to the traditional pumpkin pie. If you don’t like cheesecake, perhaps pumpkin crumb pie is to your liking, or perhaps a layered pumpkin cake. Even if you don’t like pumpkin spice, something made with pumpkin is traditionally served as part of Thanksgiving Dinner.

Regardless of what’s on your table, the traditional time to eat your holiday feast is between the hours of 2 pm to 4 pm. For some reason, the early afternoon has become the popular time to serve Thanksgiving dinner. Many believe it is to give the family time to come together and also for your dinner to digest before digging into the pies. Whatever the reason, one thing is for certain. Your table’s a mess, your kitchen is a mess, and you’ll probably need all evening for that dreaded and dreary clean-up.

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